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C1: Young Art


Original description: The German Fonds Soziokultur and the Dutch Cultural Participation Fund present their joint programme for exchange and cooperation ‘Young Art’. Kurt Eichler (Germany) and Jan Jaap Knol (The Netherlands) share their views on the meaning of the participatory practices their foundations support for nowadays society. With their bilateral agreement aimed at small-scale projects the foundations offer a tailor-made approach for international cooperation. Kurt and Jan Jaap will present concrete projects from Dutch and German organisations who share a long history of successful cooperations. Other projects include a creative hackathon of artists, hackers and designers, a literary bicycle tour and podcasting workshops for the LGBTQ community amongst immigrants. Results such as an evaluation report and new digital means of international interaction will be presented and discussed. This session provides inspiration and guidance for both policy makers and practitioners in education and participation who consider transboundary cooperation. 

Subsidy Programme ‘Young Art’ (in Dutch only)
Young Art: what we’ve learned (in Dutch only)
Project example: Literatour


Results / lessons learned


  • Cooperation across borders is possible, even though there are differences in how you are financed and even large differences in budgets to be spent. As long as you recognize each other in your goals and vision. But you have to meet each other personally.
  • Process is very important, meet & match helps, especially when doing an application. You have to understand each other's cultures a bit and that is not possible without going into a process together to arrive at a product.
  • There is a joint German-Dutch jury that assesses the applications; make sure you always work with a neutral chairman of the jury. But do not mix up the organizational aspects of the countries, then everything becomes even more bureaucratic. First gain experience with a neighboring country before venturing into the European bureaucracy of fundraising.
  • Working with young people is such a big responsibility and opportunity: they are really a mirror of society and they often have their own identity problems.